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Mission:
The purpose of the Ozarks Amateur Astronomers Club is to create and foster public interest in astronomy through presentations and public observing nights.
April 29th 2011 NASA Open House

NASA observing night will be on Friday, April 29th, 2011, from 8:00 P.M. to 10:30 P.M., weather permitting. This is a wonderful opportunity to do some amazing observing under a dark sky! You will also have an opportunity to look through one of the university’s larger telescopes!

NASA Night is also one of our biggest fundraising nights, so if anyone is interested in briefly helping out, please let Kevin know. See this link for directions: - NASA Observing Night - - kevcollette

 

News
April 1st, 2011 - Observing Night and Club Meeting
We will be heading to Baker Observatory Friday night, April 1st, for a club observing night. We will be meeting there at the observatory at 8:00 PM but in anyone needs a ride let me know in advance so I can make sure we have enough cars available. I will be picking up those needing a ride from in front of Kemper Hall at 7:15 and leaving by 7:25. Those needing help finding Baker Observatory can follow me out from there. - Scott

 

Baker Observatory Clear Sky Chart:
This is an astronomers forecast showing when it will be cloudy or clear for the next two days at Baker Observatory. Clicking the image will take you to the image host along with more detailed information and forecasts.

 

NASA Watch - Is NASA Leading A Shift In Administration Climate Change Views?
   
NASA Image of the Day
Image of the Day" image. This glittering ball of stars is the globular cluster NGC 1898, which lies toward the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud. On Oct. 18, 1989, space shuttle Atlantis deployed NASA's Galileo spacecraft six hours, 30 minutes into the STS-34 mission. Galileo arrived at Jupiter in December, 1995 and spent eight years in orbit around the gas giant, becoming the first spacecraft to orbit an outer planet. This artist’s conception of the core of Cygnus A shows the dusty donut-shaped surroundings, called a torus, and jets launching from its center. Viewed from a window inside the cupola, the International Space Station's "window to the world," is the Japanese Exploration Agency's H-II Transfer Vehicle-7. During National Hispanic Heritage Month, we're celebrating the achievements of astronaut Ellen Ochoa and other Hispanic astronauts and professionals at NASA. Floating upside down and reading a checklist may not be how most of us perform the day's work, but it was for Ochoa on Space Shuttle Discovery's STS-96 mission. This view of southern California was taken by the Apollo 7 crew during their 18th revolution of the Earth on Oct. 12, 1968. Cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin of Roscosmos, left, and astronaut Nick Hague of NASA, right. embrace their families after landing at the Krayniy Airport. This composite image shows the International Space Station, with a crew of three onboard, in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second, Sunday, Oct. 7, 2018. The Soyuz rocket is rolled out by train to the launch pad, Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018, for the Expedition 57 launch. During National Hispanic Heritage Month, we're celebrating the contributions of the brilliant Hispanic women and men of NASA. In this image, astronaut Joe Acaba installs botany gear for the International Space Station's Veggie facility, to demonstrate plant growth in space. The landing jets fire as the Soyuz MS-08 spacecraft lands with Drew Feustel, Ricky Arnold and Oleg Artemyev, members of the Expedition 55 and 56 crews onboard the International Space Station. International Space Station Commander Alexander Gerst has a better view of our home planet than most. International Space Station astronaut and former teacher Ricky Arnold works with a student-designed experiment using NanoRacks commercial science hardware. Aeronautics, the first A of the NASA acronym, has always been a part of the agency. This Aug. 5 1968 image was taken aboard the MV Retriever in the Gulf of Mexico, where the Apollo 7 crew, Walter Schirra, Walter Cunningham and Donn Eisele practiced water egress procedures in preparation for the October 1968 mission. During National Hispanic Heritage Month, we're celebrating the contributions of the brilliant Hispanic women and men of NASA. In this Feb. 2007 photo, astronaut Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, Expedition 14 commander, participates in a 6-hour, 40-minute spacewalk as construction continues on the International Space Station. NASA still hasn't heard from the Opportunity rover, but at least we can see it again. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory views our Sun in ten different wavelengths because each wavelength reveals different solar features. John W. Young (1930-2018), born on Sept. 24, was NASA's longest-serving astronaut and the only astronaut to fly missions in the Gemini, Apollo and Space Shuttle Programs. In the northern constellation of Coma Berenices lies the impressive Coma Cluster — a structure of over a thousand galaxies bound together by gravity. The International Space Station deployed this small satellite for the NanoRacks-Remove Debris investigation, designed to demonstrate an approach to reduce the risks presented by orbital debris or "space junk." Just over a month into its mission, NASA's Parker Solar Probe has returned first-light data from each of its four instrument suites. These early observations show that each of the instruments is working well. During National Hispanic Heritage Month, we're celebrating the contributions of the brilliant Hispanic women and men of NASA. In this photo from Expedition 56, NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor examines her eye with a Funduscope. A Delta II rocket launches with NASA's ICESat-2 onboard, Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018, from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. A long, brown oval known as a "brown barge" in Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt is captured in this color-enhanced image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. NASA completed the final test to qualify Orion’s parachute system for flights with astronauts, an important milestone on the path to send humans on missions to deep space. Ever stared down the gaping eye of a category 4 hurricane? It's chilling, even from space. Astronaut Ricky Arnold, from aboard the International Space Station, shared this image of Hurricane Florence on Sept. 10, taken as the orbiting laboratory flew over the massive storm. Bright surface features on the dwarf planet Ceres known as faculae were first discovered by NASA's Dawn spacecraft in 2015. Over a mere four days this summer, snow from the previous winter melted into a pond of slush a glaciologist called a “snow swamp.” A truck sprays water to reduce the dust as NASA's crawler-transporter 2 with the mobile launcher atop moves slowly along, on its trek to Launch Pad 39B. Long, narrow clouds, known as ship tracks, stood out against the backdrop of marine clouds blanketing much of the North Pacific Ocean. The little-known nebula IRAS 05437+2502 billows out among the bright stars and dark dust clouds that surround it. Guy Bluford, the first African-American astronaut, launched into space on shuttle Challenger's STS-8 mission thirty-five years ago, on August 30, 1983. An expedition that will help NASA search for life in deep space launched today – not with a rocket’s roar, but with a gentle splash into the deep Pacific Ocean. The project will use underwater robots to explore the environment around a deep-sea volcano off the coast of Hawaii that has similar conditions to what may exist on Saturn’s moon Enceladus. Astronauts get to observe the Earth in all her beauty from aboard the International Space Station. A member of the Expedition 56 crew currently onboard the station took this nighttime image of Java, Indonesia's largest island. Striking atmospheric features in Jupiter’s northern hemisphere are captured in this series of color-enhanced images from NASA’s Juno spacecraft. Even if the air looks clear, it is nearly certain that you will inhale millions of solid particles and liquid droplets. These ubiquitous specks of matter are known as aerosols, and they can be found in the air over oceans, deserts, mountains, forests, ice and every ecosystem in between. The world is on fire. Or so it appears in this image from NASA's Worldview. NASA astronaut Ricky Arnold photographed a massive storm in the Pacific Ocean during a flyover from the International Space Station. Arnold shared images on social media on Aug. 22, 2018, and wrote, "#HurricaneLane in the early morning hours near #Hawaii. The crew of the @Space_Station sends much aloha to everyone there." One year ago on August 21, 2017, the continental United States experienced the first total solar eclipse in 99 years. Our cloud-covered planet is seen from aboard the International Space Station. Wishing legendary NASA flight director Gene Kranz the happiest of birthdays! NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) scientists used their computer models to generate a view of the Sun's magnetic field on August 10, 2018. The bright active region right at the central area of the Sun clearly shows a concentration of field lines, as well as the small active region at the Sun's right edge. Ever wondered what auroras look like from space? The largest fire in California's history, the Mendocino Complex, is still spewing clouds of smoke across the state. A United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket launches NASA's Parker Solar Probe on a mission to touch the Sun, on Sunday, Aug. 12, 2018 from Launch Complex 37 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. Inside the United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket payload fairing on Wednesday, August 8, 2018, the Parker Solar is slated to launch at 3:33 a.m. EDT, Saturday, August 11. Who was Mary Ross? Another 'hidden figure,' a mathematician and engineer. On August 8, 1978, the Pioneer Venus Multiprobe spacecraft launched to study Venus, a planet that has an atmosphere 100 times denser than Earth’s atmosphere and is hotter than the melting point of zinc and lead. The Columbia Glacier descends from an ice field 10,000 feet and into a narrow inlet that leads into Prince William Sound in southeastern Alaska. The Earth, in all its majesty and its tragedy, is the subject of images taken aboard the International Space Station. This image of the Carr and Ferguson fires was captured from the station on August 3, 2018, by European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst. The first U.S. astronauts who will fly on American-made commercial spacecraft, to and from the International Space Station, wave after being announced, Friday, Aug. 3, 2018. NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine tours the inside of the Orion test crew capsule, Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018 at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. More than a dozen wildfires are burning in the state of California, with several of them threatening life and property The International Space Station soars into a sunrise every 90 minutes, each and every day. July 26 is National Intern Day. See how far these two former interns at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory have come! Saturn is the solar system’s most photogenic planet, especially in this latest Hubble snapshot with the ring system near its maximum tilt. NASA's Orion spacecraft that flew Exploration Flight Test-1 on Dec. 5, 2014, is seen after being uncovered in preparation for being moved onto the White House complex, Saturday, July 21, 2018, in Washington, DC. More than 1,000 companies across the country manufactured or contributed elements to the spacecraft. On July 24, 1969, the Apollo 11 crew splashed down in the Pacific Ocean.
   

Last Updated March 15th, 2008 by Scott Maasen CETsr. 2008 Ozarks Amateur Astronomers Club. All Rights Reserved.